Episode Collection: Year 12

Border + The Princess Bride

Border + The Princess Bride

Bill and Teds Excellent Adventure + Pauly Shore is Dead

Bill and Teds Excellent Adventure + Pauly Shore is Dead

A moment in California surfer youth unexpectedly captures the imagination and attention of a nation. One film seizes it with the success of a franchise, the other can’t hold on no matter how many films are made.

American Buffalo + The Company Men

American Buffalo + The Company Men

Taking another step toward understand writing and cinematography!

Bride of Frankenstein + The Haunting

Bride of Frankenstein + The Haunting

When a Stranger Calls Back + Prom Night 2

When a Stranger Calls Back + Prom Night 2

Sort of made for TV movie day! Two films that are not what they seem. Director Fred Walton returns to Double Feature in When a Stranger Calls Back. Ventriloquist horror. Ideas so stupid they’re amazing. Voice throwing and camouflage. The strangeness of suspension of disbelief. An accidental 2010s horror film made in the early ’90s. Way too good for TV. Prom Night 2: Where’s the Colon? Terminator and The Prophecy ruined sequels being on Double Feature. Double Feature makes up facts. Making a film into a sequel after the fact. No one’s seen Psycho 6. The numbers game of film titling. Subject matter expertise. Horror zeitgeist and genre awareness.

Tickled + Graphic Sexual Horror

Tickled + Graphic Sexual Horror

Warning – Double Feature assumes you just watched these two films. This is not a conversation to provide an introduction to these movies. This episode digs into the most difficult questions posed by two disturbing documentaries. It’s up to an individual audience member to decide if they wish to watch the films, but it’s certainly a bad idea to listen to this episode without having seen them. With that in mind, taking two films of an increasingly extreme subject matter at face value. Having a conversation films ask you to have. When there’s no hope of going back. Using BDSM to trick people into doing farm work (and other low key crimes against humanity). Continue reading

This Must Be the Place + Get Carter

This Must Be the Place + Get Carter

The reckoning. A giant assault of Massive Attack returns to Double Feature with This Must Be The Place and the original Get Carter. Eric tries and fails to not talk about Robert Smith. Using a real-life icon as visual shorthand. Killing Nazis was once normal, then weird, then less weird. Succeeding despite fulfillment. A movie about the character after their interesting story is over. Going back to killing work with Get Carter. The things you learn about Get Carter from Hollywood parties. The lack of violence in a 70s film. Not being able to kill your way to an answer. Watching pornographic films projecting in people’s homes. The Get Carter score and trip-hop. Not wasting time when you plan to kill someone. The inconsistent feel of vigilante justice in cinema. Michael does not advocate killing people, then throws a state execution grenade. Enjoy.

Nocturnal Animals + Stranger Than Fiction

Nocturnal Animals + Stranger Than Fiction

The written word comes to life don’t roll your eyes at me. Writers who specifically hurt one person, with and without malice. Always showing up and actually covering the movies, like Tom Ford’s Nocturnal Animals and Marc Forster’s Stranger Than Fiction. Curating film. Attacking the wall head on with Nocturnal Animals. Eric’s love of high fashion. Interpreting subtle casting choices. Superficiality, high society, and penetrating the defenses of the untouchable. Super brutal art drama. Stranger Than Fiction, or that one film where Will Ferrell is serious. Like Cold Souls and Waiter, but on Double Feature. Dying at a poetically-appropriate time. Bits from the Fight Club fire sale. Ignoring the question of free will because it’s never interesting. Not explaining the backstory in your meta-comedy. In hindsight, kale smoothies are kind of good.

Killapalooza 37: Species

Killapalooza 37: Species

Species films 1-4. Pronunciation guides courtesy of plingmichael.com. What makes a Killapalooza. Species is more than just green porn. Baby Michele Williams. All great actors started in horror films. ’90s icky creature films. Finding a good human specimen. Director Peter Medak returns to Double Feature for Species 2. Failure due to a lack of mutant rats. When you make things super rapey via gender swap. The Weezer of franchises. The last film when you can get a righteous jerk in. The inverse relationship of nudity and creature effects. Blah blah science. Mad scientists and succubus. Solving all your problems by creating alien harems. Gigantic Assault and Photos of You.

Only Lovers Left Alive + Sun Don’t Shine

Only Lovers Left Alive + Sun Don’t Shine

Couples, long and short. Double Feature, hyping art and Jim Jarmusch’s Only Lovers Left Alive and Amy Seimetz’s Sun Don’t Shine. Patrons, hyping Double Feature and not picking this week’s films. When in doubt, Tilda Swinton. The curse of immortality. The non-horror, non-vampire-movie vampire movie. Having a sense of scale. The repetition of everything except art. Companionship, perspective, genius, and nihilism. Comparing any given moment in time to the greatest moments in all human history. People kept together through murder. It’s probably not in our best interest to kill each other. Murder as a relationship test. Florida Man, the movie. Whether you sympathize with the person giving or receiving road head. Making films for little money. Festivals and additional content.

Bokeh + The Signal

Bokeh + The Signal

You wake up, and suddenly everything is different. Kittie is exciting and nü, like Kickstarter, which helped fund Bokeh and used to almost-fund Double Feature. The things that are out-of-focus. What if everyone else just disappeared? Pragmatism versus religion and nihilism. Having a survivable worldview. Michael makes an argument against survival in a world without new films. There is no point in life; Michael’s okay with that and Eric’s panicking about it. The Signal is a nü and interesting horror anthology. The number of directors in your horror anthology. Films showing small pieces of a global event. Bold choices, like male nudity and a secret anthology full of unreliable narrators. Finding something familiar to hold onto in difficult films. The use of tonal shifts in film and improving the overall narrative through the anthology format.

Howl’s Moving Castle + Cronos

Howl’s Moving Castle + Cronos

Adult whimsey, the burden of eternal life, and the vision of Hayao Miyazaki contrasted against Guillermo del Toro. Howl’s Moving Castle. Early use of computers in animation. Animation that looks good has succeeded. Filmmakers should be free to explore, change, and grow. Miyazaki as an anti-war activist. War as background noise to Americans and in Howl’s Moving Castle. Enriching a film with weird characters. Secret Mexican Frankenstein. Unhinged Ron Perlman. ¿Como se dice gravitas en español? The State of American Cinema is … uh, let’s talk about that another time.

For Your Consideration + The Man Who Killed Don Quixote

For Your Consideration + The Man Who Killed Don Quixote

Creating art kills humans. Other things that could be done For Your Consideration. Double Feature gets rained on. The happy warrior spirit of creation vs the nihilism of trying to get art made. Eric Thirteen performs for the patreons. Life on set. The drama of film production. For Your Consideration shows how rumors run wild. Double Feature fucks up Christopher Guest. The non-documentary Christopher Guest movie is the most honest. Terry Gilliam and the frustrating life of an artist. Art is hard. The story outside The Man Who Killed Don Quixote makes a call for not ignoring the real-life artist.

Amadeus + Perfume The Story of a Murderer

Amadeus + Perfume The Story of a Murderer

Two films about innate genius, giggles, and sniffing. Miloš Forman’s Amadeus is one of the greatest films ever made. Using bookends and unreliable narration to tell a more interesting story. Michael’s firsthand experience of being the Mozart and Salieri in his music career. Madness and genius in film. Double Sleepy Nap Time returns. Tom Tykwer’s Perfume: The Story of a Murderer. Portraying smell in film with the help of macro shots. How did this film get made? Why didn’t people listen to Roger Ebert and see Perfume? Eric discusses the unusually weird ending of Perfume. Michael discusses the totally normal ending of Perfume.

The Untouchables + The Ladykillers

The Untouchables + The Ladykillers

Considering the voice of the writer and cinematographer. A new journey explores the work of David Mamet and Roger Deakins. Learning about screenwriting through brute force, with and without notes. The Untouchables, seen through the writing of Mamet. Poetics and smart, big, bright light cinema. Watching The Ladykillers and listening for the voice of a film after the Coen Brothers. Telling a story exclusively through the visuals. Eric explains dirtying up the frame.

Berberian Sound Studio + The Picture of Dorian Gray

Berberian Sound Studio + The Picture of Dorian Gray

The art life. The horror of what you don’t see and indirectly hurting others through art. Berberian Sound Studio is the best horror film no one has been yelling at you to watch. Making the viewer uncomfortable without showing the horror. Can horror drive its viewer mad? Elevating an actor from supporting to lead to create more compelling art. Dorian Grey makes a return to Double Feature with Albert Lewin’s 1945 adaptation of The Picture of Dorian Grey. Being able to be kind of a dick, but witty enough that everyone still loves you. Oscar Wilde’s characters as versions of himself, and that’s okay. The horror of making someone else suffer the consequences of your lifestyle.

Invaders from Mars + Heavy Metal

Invaders from Mars + Heavy Metal

Step into a world of child like wonder. Or maybe one is just, like, smut. It’s time for an adults-are-childen Double Feature. Also, an accidental Dan O’Bannon Double Feature. Tobe Hooper’s Invaders from Mars is a children’s film. What happened to children’s films starring children?  Understanding the art of the underappreciated Master of Horror. Weird practical effects and surprise endings. South Park helps keep Michael from having to discuss Heavy Metal directly. Film for horny teenagers and adults who like fun. Further iterations of Heavy Metal and other smutty nonsense. Netflix Non-tent. Defining the lines between nudity, erotica, and porn.

Eden Lake + The Wicker Man

Eden Lake + The Wicker Man

Summer break has arrived. Eden Lake and The Wicker Man: two films about being in the wrong place at the wrong time and doing wrong. Hooded teens and Broken Britain come to your very American hosts with Eden Lake. Eric finally gets to talk about Eden Lake. Fighting children is somehow never considered okay. Machismo, intrusion, escalation of conflict, hopelessness, and razors. The Wicker Man, but not the NOT THE BEES one. Other things notably absent from the horror masterpiece, The Wicker Man: Nicolas Cage, in bear suit, punching an old woman in the face. Purging yourself of Nick Cage so you can enjoy the greatness of the original and the completely different, superior execution of the same story. Mystery cults and being in over one’s head. Religious ritual, sacrifice, and futility of prayer.

Ratatouille + Big Man Japan

Ratatouille + Big Man Japan

Heroes large and small? Michael finally gets to watch Ratatouille. Big Man Japan Bites Dog. Brad Bird returns to the show with Ratatouille, the best Pixar film. Michael attempts to shame Podmanity for never watching the films. The only perfect film is formulaic and entirely predictable. The villain is not really that bad. Hitoshi Matsumoto returns to the show as director and star of Big Man Japan. Getting big to defend Japan from monsters. Legacy superhero and the superhero’s legacy in boredom culture. Using a faux expose documentary to examine aspects of our broader culture. The impact of Man Bites Dog. Careful cultivation of one’s image. Getting your head run over by a film’s ending.

City of the Living Dead + Three Colors Blue

City of the Living Dead + Three Colors Blue

Spiritual trilogies align as Double Feature covers a new pair of filmmakers. A freshly minted episode to begin Lucio Fulchi’s Gates of Hell trilogy and Krzysztof Kieślowski’s colors trilogy. Michael has a high thoughts lists and a silent colon. Giallo, cause that’s what you want. Pretend gore never hurt anybody. Polish director Kieślowski makes his first non-AC appearance on Double Feature. Did you know the French flag consists of three colors? A meditation on freedom, like the kind of freedom when your whole family dies. Art doesn’t need to worry about its audience liking it. Sometimes you know that everyone is going to make fun of your excessively heavy film, but you should make your excessively heavy film because fuck ’em.

Blade Runner + Fargo

Blade Runner + Fargo

It’s finally happening. Year 12 begins here. The perfect introduction for a new Double Feature listener: Blade Runner and Fargo, the most-requested listener films from a decade ago. Eric tries to embrace the fresh start. Michael embraces the show’s deep cuts. The many versions of Blade Runner and which one best captures Ridley Scott’s vision. Double Feature gets some more Dick. What makes something a Fargo story? The Coen Brothers’ Fargo and recent Fargo television series. Coen characters, relatability, Peter Stormare, and something about wood chippers.