Episode Collection: Year 13

Double Feature Year 13 Finale

Double Feature Year 13 Finale

Get access to ALL previous episodes at Patreon.com/DoubleFeature – starting fresh? This is a great first episode to listen to! A full reset of Double Feature begins next episode. For now, here’s a spoiler-free retrospective of the entire last year. Each year of Double Feature is a self-contained series. The podcast looks at two movies every week in a quest to determine what’s notable about them. First up, a whole year of loglines. What is a logline, why is it important to film discover, and will this type of analysis continue? Throughout the year, additional themes, motifs, and advertising spins are considered. At the end of the year, the finale episode (this very episode) takes a look back at the entire run. Journeys, marathons, triple features, and more all get one last conclusion before the show takes a fresh start. Continue reading

Oh, God! + Yes, God, Yes

Oh, God! + Yes, God, Yes

For the last episode of Double Feature, the show declares victory in the war on religion. Mission Accomplished! With religion completely eradicated in the United States, Americans can focus on what really matters: self-pleasure! Double Feature takes a look at god in cinema. Once a prominent figure, god is now such a fringe part of modern life that films almost need to explain what it is. The absurdity of telling an audience what god is supposed to be isn’t much worse than telling them what the true meaning of anything is. Religion poisons everything. Masturbation as a sub-set of masturbation. Double Feature plans a look back. Continue reading

Tammy and the T-Rex + Behind the Curve

Tammy and the T-Rex + Behind the Curve

Good and evil nonsense. A new release honors the late John Carl Buechler’s original gore effects as the Tammy and the T-Rex Vinegar Syndrome restoration blurs the line between 1994 release and 2019 release. Freshening up an old Double Feature gag. Who will admit that Tammy and the T-Rex actually happened (also, did it?) Denise Richards rides off on a dinosaur. Why do the restoration? Behind the Curve is a flat-earthers documentary, and it’s fun, and is that ok? Why people believe weird things. The power of community, even when the word “community” mostly just means an intangible thing in a sad person’s mind. What’s the harm? Remembering the work of James Randi. Continue reading

Porco Rosso + My Life as a Zucchini

Porco Rosso + My Life as a Zucchini

The final stop in the Studio Ghibli stop motion adventure. The journey comes to and end as year finale questions are flirted with. What Porco Rosso means to someone who has just watched a string of Studio Ghibli films. A single adventure in a larger world. There are symbolic Studio Ghibli war movies and then there are Studio Ghibli movies wherein the war occurred or is even portrayed. Hayao Miyazaki antagonists. My Life as a Zucchini is called Ma vie de Courgette in French, which sometimes leads to the English version being called My Life as a Courgette. Especially if you’re quite British. A defense of G-rated film for fans of ugly subject matter films. The utility of motifs for visual and meditative storytellers. Various motifs in My Life as a Zucchini. Continue reading

Deerskin + Get Duked!

Deerskin + Get Duked!

Country side gets fucked in to grounded movies that spin into surreal wtf nightmares. Deerskin, also known as Le daim, also known as this weird fucking Quentin Depieux film. One cannot prepare for Depieux weird. What the jacket really wants. The unlikely stars who show up for this bizarre time. Coat-wearing dysmorphia. A horror film for some, a great fantasy about filmmaking for others. Get Duked! as a Danny Brown v Run the Jewels hip-hop megacut. The music videos of Ninian Doff. The D of E! The plot of Get Duked is based on a real, no kidding Duke of Edinburgh award which is a very real thing that very real british kids can all go do. How a fast paced film can go beyond the machine for empathy and become an audiovisual adrenaline shot. Continue reading

Lost in Translation + He Died with a Felafel in His Hand

Lost in Translation + He Died with a Felafel in His Hand

Adrift in the world. Two Americans get Lost in Translation. The midlife crisis is a redux of the 20 something finding their place in the world. 2003, Focus Features, and the rise of the existential indie into the mainstream. It’s ok to be a rude fuck if no one can understand you anyways. It would be nice if Americans learned something about the immigrant experience from Lost In Translation but that’s probably too much to ask. Double Feature takes a trip back to magic time in their lives with He Died with a Felafel in His Hand. Missing out on the present. Eric recalls the most obvious thing he didn’t even think to film during The Birthday Massacre 2006 Bootleg. Continue reading

Sound of Metal + Jacob’s Ladder

Sound of Metal + Jacob’s Ladder

Addiction to normalcy. Moving demanding conversation: the style of the Sound of Metal debut could mark the return of the film festival style release (even if there was no festival). An entire way of life is threatened, and with it goes the sense of normalcy. The denial phase. How drug addition is the unspoken experience looming over Sound of Metal. Avant-garde music is the perfect choice for the film. The pain of audio in a visual-heavy medium. Manipulating language to keep the audience alienated. The notable consciousness-threatening first hour of Jacob’s Ladder. Michael believes the audience’s entire relationship with the film’s madness can be pinpointed to a single critical scene. What was happening in horror when Jacob’s Ladder came out and how it may have secretly helped pay the way for the new tone of the 90s. Continue reading

The Lure + The Untamed

The Lure + The Untamed

Art-smut! Tentacles and sea-foam reign as Double Feature continues to live deliciously. The Lure find another coming of age use for genre metaphor. What are the rules of the world in The Lure and more importantly, to what ends are they used? Eric makes a stretch for trans-themes and honestly give it a go. What the ending of The Lure could me for audiences and also teenage girls. The Untamed from the tentacle’s perspective. Who are the players and how are their stories intermingled? Homophobia, repression, guilt and shame. No one shame this tentacle though, it’s doing its best. Character mysteries once the plot is settled. Continue reading

Booksmart + Moonlight

Booksmart + Moonlight

Mainstream films with the stomach for sexuality identity discourse. Booksmart makes an appeal to both blockbuster and niche audiences. Rewatchability – how editing and pace and reward an audiences many times over. Challenging the far too common trope of sexual identity and experimentation in the college years. Other ways Booksmart pushes narrative to be just a bit more sophisticated. Moonlight is a surprising breakthrough. Why Moonlight should garner attention even before any discussion on its themes or narrative. Picasso’s Bull. Dissecting the relatability of a film you don’t see yourself in. Double minorities and the fracturing of networks of support. Continue reading

Memories of Murder + The House That Jack Built

Memories of Murder + The House That Jack Built

Punishing cinema gets criminal. Memories of a Murder subvert the ringer trope. What makes this Bong Joon-ho film truly upsetting. South Korean cinema creeps up on Double Feature in a retrospective of the films covered so far. The unrated cut of The House That Jack Built and the MPAA fuckery that caused it. A report from the sold-out one-night-only showing of Lars von Trier’s uncut killing spree. Art is Murder. No, you’re thinking of The Smith’s song. Getting away without rolling the eyes. How The House That Jack Built provokes in new ways. The stories about Lars and how they feed into the controversial film. Always remember: fuck Hulu. Continue reading

Chelsea Girls + Bad Girls Go to Hell

Chelsea Girls + Bad Girls Go to Hell

Sex and sexploitation. Artfuck films ask the world to rethink their preconceptions on cinema and smut. Chelsea Girls provides a deep dive into Andy Warhol. What is actually on the screen during the runtime of Chelsea Girls? Why is it there? What does it mean? How Any Warhol films were made. What Any wanted as an artist. The Factory and factory films. Bad Girls Go to Hell causes Eric to take a pause on sexploitation. Exploitation films as a Chicago-based phenomenon. In an era where audiences and consumers are more conscious of their choices than ever, what is the value of programing Bad Girls Go to Hell? Asking hard questions about what audiences give a spotlight to. A new Woody Allen documentary series provides a brutal point of comparison. Continue reading

The Martian + Fermat’s Room

The Martian + Fermat’s Room

Rooting for smart people to solve the room. Matt Damon is making it work on Mars. Building a narrative feature film with a protagonist who has no one to interact with. Charm and charisma is apparently how you avoid 90 minutes of talking to plants. The power of great people doing their best work. Plant-based devastation. Solving Fermat’s Room before grandma’s Facebook feed does it for you. A broader conversation about the solvable bottle movie. Contained puzzle thriller role-call. Triangles not included. Circle and the race to strip down the escape room. Continue reading

Set it Off + Sugar and Spice

Set it Off + Sugar and Spice

Two fills that could nearly get away with the same synopsis. Another music video director turned feature storyteller. Queen Latifah proves to be an amazing on-screen force. Character-drive heisting. Remembering back to the good times. The one scene in Set It Off that should be on every goddamn list. Sugar and Spice is a whiplash change in tone. Speaking to the American Dream. How Sugar & Spice calls out the capitalistic fantasy that is America. Middle class revolt. Eric changes sides on the video-store-guy trope. Continue reading

Tales from Earthsea + Corpse Bride

Tales from Earthsea + Corpse Bride

This stop on the Studio Ghibli meets stop motion adventure takes the infamous final act turn. Two of the most divisive movies in their series. The burden of expectations. First, Tales from Earthsea takes a popular fantasy series of fiction and distills it down until its basic elements before distilling further until it’s not really distilling so much as just creating something entirely different with the same character names. Goro Miyazaki handles the expectations of the family name. Then, Tim Burton fans recon with the lightning in a bottle of previous stop motion films bearing his name. An honest look at Corpse Bride as the show attempts to view it with fresh eyes. Continue reading

Knives Out + 8 Women

Knives Out + 8 Women

Agatha Crispies. A little bit of “if you like American movie, try foreign movie”. Knives Out + 8 Women. First, Kate Hagen brings attention to an alarming trend that’s causing films to be completely lost to new audiences. Knives Out as a very unlikely blockbuster. Making bold choices in a broad movie. Eight Women, also known in as Huit Femmes, was doing Knives Out before Knives Out was doing it. The bizarre comedy in the music and editing of eight women. Continue reading

Pieta + Blue My Mind

Pieta + Blue My Mind

Mysterious family lineages lead to some nightmarish happenings. Pieta is an intense film even before the legacy of the director. How pieta manages to be about not only interpersonal conflict but also class warfare. Blue My Mind becomes a conduit for a larger conversation on genre-lite coming of age films. Is it better to dance around the much desired genre elements or lean in at risk of under-delivering? Why coming of age and fantasy go so well together. In a special Double Feature emergency: something alarming is happening to the films you love (and the future films you might). Kate Hagen wrote about it in her article Continue reading

Dig! + Killing Bono

Dig! + Killing Bono

Truth and fiction are blurred in a look at why some bands make it and some don’t. Dig! as a documentary everyone who cares about art should see (whether they like music or not). Oh hey wait, it’s THAT band. When someone gets several once in a lifetime shots at fame (and throws them away every time). Paul Hewson and the boys. Trying to make it in music when the other band from your small town is U2. That’s Killing Bono for you. Two films compare two bands side to side for a total of four musical acts – three that people have heard of, and one that had a film written about then. Very, very bizarre musical math. Continue reading

Destroyer + You Were Never Really Here

Destroyer + You Were Never Really Here

Two emotionally damaged people go on the warpath. Creating a pitch for Destroyer. The marketing and presentation of Destroyer – which buttons to push? Not the first Karyn Kusama for Double Feature. Taboo sexual encounters for the record books. Elevated police procedurals, a twist on structure, and a different kind of Los Angeles. You Were Never Really Here gets another half-hearted pitch in an attempt to lure out it’s themes. Bizarre structure strikes again. You Were Never Really Here as a picture of toxic masculinity. Continue reading

Killapalooza 40: Maniac Cop

Killapalooza 40: Maniac Cop

Maniac Cop films 1-3. A look at the entire Maniac Cop franchise, William Lustig, Larry Cohen, and Robert Z’Dar’s Maniac Cop! Trying to talk about killer cops after the popular conscious has realized that cops are a self-sorted bunch of killers. Can a killer cop franchise still be fun while we’re recognizing with ACAB? Surprisingly yes, and it might be thanks to the extra layer the conversation has added to otherwise deliciously-fluffy films of 80s VHS violence. The cop, the fire suit, and the ongoing attempt to find plot. Double Feature continues to write loglines, and for the first time, maybe the first loglines a film has ever had written. Continue reading

Elle + The Piano Teacher

Elle + The Piano Teacher

Psychosexual arthouse films are not for everyone. Actually, it could be argued that they’re not for anyone. This is not the most important conversation in cinema – it’s what people who see too many weird movies discuss in the safety of arthouses. However, after nearly a year of arthouses being closed around the country (and everyone having seen too many weird movies at home), the arthouse is very much missed. This episode examines two films of Isabelle Huppert, giving space to these very provocative conversations spurned by the films of directors Paul Verhoeven and Michael Haneke. Is it for everyone? No. Is it for anyone? That remains to be seen. Are there merit to these films? Absolutely. Double Feature gives fair warning, then breaks down Elle and The Piano Teacher. Continue reading

Bullitt + The Last Black Man in San Francisco

Bullitt + The Last Black Man in San Francisco

Double Feature takes a trip to San Francisco to welcome its newest resident. Two films taking place in the city by the bay. Taking on the plot of Bullitt instead of spending twenty minutes talking about the edit of that infamous chase scene. Flying over the SF hills. The bizarre people people Bullitt. What The Last Black Man in San Francisco says about the city. Gentrification as a universal human issue. The ever-changing face of the golden city. The Paris of the West! Fog City, Gay Mecca, The City that Knows How, seriously, how many more of these could one want? American cinema would have you believe all its citizens live on farms and honestly it’s garbage. Continue reading

No Country for Old Men + Yellow Rose

No Country for Old Men + Yellow Rose

Double Feature says goodbye to Texas! Two films with differing takes on Texas. Keeping the film community together. No Country for Old Men and the ever changing world in which we live in. Yellow Rose is a very modern Austin. On the ground insight. Continue reading

Grave of the Fireflies + Kubo and the Two Strings

Grave of the Fireflies + Kubo and the Two Strings

Studio Ghibli meet back up with stop motion! If you must blink, do it now. Pay careful attention to everything you see and hear, no matter how unusual it may seem. And please be warned, if you fidget, if you look away, if you forget any part of what I tell you, even for an instant, then our hero will surely perish. Seriously, stop looking at your phone. Goddamnit, did you hear none of that? Go back and re-read it. Ok, but you can’t let your eyes de-focus. Just one time, try to take in the words. One fucking time. Please. Continue reading

Birdman + Punch-Drunk Love

Birdman + Punch-Drunk Love

Actors breaking free from their shackles. Keaton is back in the rumor mill, and this time it isn’t a Beetlejuice remake. Whether he’s going to play Batman again or not, he will certainly always be the Birdman. Michael Koester insists on calling the 2014 film Birdman “Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance).” Why would you start the parenthetical after the word “or”? Shouldn’t it be Birdman (or The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)? The single take and how to solve the problem of scene tempo. Adam Sandler, also doing whatever the Adam Sandler version of Beetlejuice 2 is. Punch-Drunk Love is also a weird film for Paul Thomas Anderson. Continue reading

Cooties + Little Monsters

Cooties + Little Monsters

Spontaneous tiny humans zombie double feature. The secret indie film pitch deck. How to see the lookbook for Cooties. The cast and that timing and the reaction. How films with kids can achieve an extra level of subversion. Jonathan Milott and Cary Murnion are HONEST. Little Monsters, but not the one that two people are expected to spend 20 minutes breaking down. What is Little Monsters actually about. The pandemic catches up to Double Feature. Being alive is still hard (and it’s not even 2020 anymore). Continue reading

Horse Girl + Possessor

Horse Girl + Possessor

Sneaking in two final movies on the last day of 2020. Prepare for intense rides! It’s time to enter someone else’s mind, and it begins with Horse Girl. Determining how much is real and how much is artistic license. Using the performance of an actor as a tool to sell something in the plot that wouldn’t work otherwise. The level message at the fucked up end of Horse Girl. Possessor, a shock as seen by people who who are new to Brandon Cronenberg. The unexpected delivery. The highest compliment you can pay a film. Searching for an undiscovered sex act. Or really just anything in a film that no one has seen before. The surprising end to 2020: it only takes two movies to discover hope for a year many wrote off. Continue reading

Mank + The Assistant

Mank + The Assistant

Time is running out for 2020. The invisible authority and the roman à clef. David Fincher and Netflix. What the film Mank says it’s about vs what it is actually about. Imagining the story of Mank just 25 years ago. A film torn from today’s headlines, masquerading as a story from the 30s. No one else wants to talk about how gross classic Hollywood was. Why are we still romanticizing this old way of thinking? Nine Inch Nails also released a Ghosts double album this year: [HALO 33] Ghosts V: Together and [HALO 34] Ghosts VI: Locusts. The Assistant as an example of film à clef. When social injustice becomes a cliche. Finding a unique vantage point into a story the audience knows. How long before the whistleblower can blow the whistle? Continue reading

White Girl + King of New York

White Girl + King of New York

Celebrating New York with a random sampling of New York drug crime. Half of Double Feature explores a brand new city! Starting on the streets with White Girl. A disagreement over the privilege of White Girl when also considering she’s the victim of various sex crimes, assault and harassment. Still, look who’s not in jail! The unique position of having to do more of the crime that got you in trouble in order to get out of trouble for that crime. King of New York provides that perfect contrasty 90s NYC mood. Who can believe Christopher Walken, Steve Buschemi, Laurence Fishburne, Wesley Snipes, it’s really just crazy town in here. A city with so much crime, only the criminals can stop it. Continue reading

L.A. Story + Under the Silver Lake

L.A. Story + Under the Silver Lake

Double Feature takes a look at Los Angeles, old and new. Vibes. Eric makes an announcement about the immediate future of 50% of Double Feature. Magic adventures through Hollywood, DTLA, Silver Lake, and not The San Fernando Valley. The personal automobile: the festish Los Angeles just can’t quit. What do people do in the city? Go out to eat and drive around in their car. The most infuriatingly true part of L.A. Story: this thing you’re making isn’t wacky enough! Michael, a guy who didn’t love It Follows, thinks Under the Silver Lake is the best film of the year. The question of personal autonomy. Los Angeles in your twenties. Awful men, drifting through life. Continue reading

Whiskey Mountain + Two Thousand Maniacs

Whiskey Mountain + Two Thousand Maniacs

Another look at exploitation. Newcomer William Grefé meets returning champion Herschell Gordon Lewis. How does southern-fried exploitation film feel after America’s 2020 swing back toward democracy?

Scare Me + Creep

Scare Me + Creep

Spending a little quarantine time with friends. Two films that are beyond gimmick. First up, Scare Me is a 2020 film that takes the anthology formula and then makes life even harder for itself. Breaking down the character arcs from the film’s logline. The secret anthology relationship Scare Me still has – hint: it’s not the segments, it’s the other part. Secondly, Creep. Eric struggles to describe Creep without asking if one of the characters is a Creep. An impossibly good found footage film that might be as good or better than all the other found footage films. Admit it already, found footage is interesting and you like it. Secret third double feature theme today: two films that have other films by the same name, and in Scare Me’s case, another film from this very year. What, were there just too many horror movies in 2020 for each one to have a unique title? Continue reading

Whisper of the Heart + Anomalisa

Whisper of the Heart + Anomalisa

The adventure continues as Double Feature pairs up another Studio Ghibli film with a stop motion film. Digging deep to find the best and worst in yourself. Whisper of the Heart is a Studio Ghibli film like few others. Waiting for a floating what-not. Self discover and ambition. Anomalisa might be stop motion, but that’s only the beginning. Anomalisa’s many devices. Continue reading

Joe + His House

Joe + His House

Try watching a movie the week voters in the United States finally defeated the president. After four long years of heartache – and with the pandemic now spiking again – Americans have decided to put someone new in charge. They’ve done so by casting the most votes than any candidate has received in history. Double Feature celebrates the decisive victory by taking an honest look at any otherwise throwaway joke with Joe + His House. First up, Nicholas Cage should be who everyone thinks of when you hear Crazy Joe. Michael has conflicts with the fly-over states. His House is a surprisingly deep and rich film with a multitude of layers. Internal conflict vs external conflict. Past vs future. A schism in the unit. Racism, immigration, ICE and the rest. Britain as a kind of Trojan horse. Continue reading

Slumdog Millionaire + Magic Mike

Slumdog Millionaire + Magic Mike

Even fluff can be painstakingly deconstructed.

Midsommar + The Lighthouse

Midsommar + The Lighthouse

Happy halloween! An trip through the decades of horror lands in the modern era. For all that is awful in the one, hold on to this one moment where two arthouse horror films had a wide theatrical release. It it utterly insane that Midsommar was a pop phenomenon. People took their nine friends to see Midsommar. It was an actual summer hit. And it’s fucking weird. Midsommar is about grief, it’s about relationships, it has a host of things an audience has never seen before (and a lot of them audiences probably wish they still hadn’t seen) and yet, here it is. A movie everyone saw. Isn’t it a great time to be alive? For those still not convinced, enter The Lighthouse! This poster was in theaters. People saw the trailer infront of the highest performing movies of the year. And it’s a constrained ratio, black and white, kitchen-sink insanity piece about two guys drinking late into the night and doing Continue reading

Valentine + Idle Hands

Valentine + Idle Hands

Y2K Horror: scares at the turn of the millennium. Eric finds something very worth-while in his least favorite era for horror. Valentine was really successful and for some reason people ignore it. A sincere attempt (and a false start) at bringing the slasher genre back. Valentine walked so Adam Green could soar. Idle Hands is pretty fucking good and for some reason people ignore it. Michael over-explains numetal. Will you bite? The hand that feeds you? Will you stay? Down on? Your knees? The various stages of the hand. American Pie presents Idle Hands. There is only one idle hand in the film Idle Hands. What films escaped Y2K alive? Continue reading

Ice Cream Man + The Dentist

Ice Cream Man + The Dentist

Straight into the heart of the 90s video films. Remember strolling through Video Value and taking a look at the covers of Ice Cream Man and The Dentist. Unorthodox Halloween continues! Another VHS, another film with renewed cult status. Clint Howard is the Ice Cream Man. The extended weirdness through sound and light. Reach back into Family Value’s discount section for the last copy of The Dentist. Straight to video does not mean unsuccessful – even financially! When a character just snaps, and then his snaps snaps, and that’s all before we even find out what’s going on with the poolboy. How many people can you fit in a dentist’s office? Continue reading

Chopping Mall + Bloody Birthday

Chopping Mall + Bloody Birthday

Off the beaten path of early 80s slasher films. The weirdest Halloween of our lives continues with two non-traditional halloween horror films. Three robots get together for good old fashion mall-cop brutality. Their victim? No, not the Bloc in Downtown Los Angeles, but instead a mall in the valley that looks suspiciously like the Beverly Center. Bloody Birthday as an experimental slasher film that was released before there were rules for this kind of thing. What happened with the 80s slasher films no one wanted to franchise? Why did some slasher films get franchises and others did not? Continue reading

Da 5 Bloods + Overlord

Da 5 Bloods + Overlord

War with a kink. How many bloods are in Da 5 Bloods? Spike Lee enters the stream. The Five Bloods. Talking about politics by actually talking about politics. How war and other tragic events shape reality for the years to come. Does a war ever truly end? Overlord, Bad Robots, and your favorite Wolfenstein level. Creating a film people will remember in their idle moments through set pieces and production design. The one WW2 element suspiciously absent from Overlord. When Hitler gets in the way of your good time. Continue reading

First Reformed + 8½

First Reformed + 8½

Unconventionally overcoming a person’s station in life. First Reformed and the path of radical activism. Inevitable comparisons to Paul Schrader’s Taxi Driver. Shouldn’t we all get radicalized? Eight and one half. How to decipher a film after you watch it and and aren’t even sure you could say what it’s about. Laying all the pieces of 8 1/2 on the table. French movies that are about something but you’re not sure what that something is. A different (and better?) way to handle the tortured genius trope. Continue reading

Cuties + Drop Dead Gorgeous

Cuties + Drop Dead Gorgeous

A look at pageants, adolescence, and outrage. Cuties, the Sundance film from France, garnered needless controversy when it accidentally became a trending topic. People on Twitter who don’t know what a movie is. Originally titled Mignonnes, Cuties is a sometimes-sweet sometimes-heartbreaking story of an 11 year old girl using dance to break free from her family’s conservative religious values and find her own identity. Save-the-children-gate only seems to go after people who aren’t pedophiles and suspiciously over-targets black female storytellers. Probably just a coincidence. Drop Dead Gorgeous disappears from planet Earth. The ephemeral nature of streaming services. 90s casting and a miraculous group Continue reading

Killapalooza 39: Night of the Demons

Killapalooza 39: Night of the Demons

Night of the Demons films 1-4. Also, there is a brand new episode of Additional Content available for members: Going Back to the Movie Theater! Now, every film from the Night of the Demons franchise (including the remake). Double Feature tries again. What is a Killapalooza? How Night of the Demons fits in the context of slasherdom. 80s horror style, gore, and nudity. A complete breakdown of Night of the Demons from brand new diehard fans. The first film never knows what’s to come. Michael visits Suncoast video. The power of sequels is realized! The approach of watching a series rather than watching individual franchise installments. The glory days of gory 80s makeup effects. Continue reading

Honey Boy + Super Dark Times

Honey Boy + Super Dark Times

And they say, where are the parents? Troubled kids in less-troubled times. Honey Boy has a lot to say about parenthood and what could be looked at as the grey shades of abuse. Pushing the logline further. The film as a secret insight into the mind and method of an actor. Super Dark Times, super good title. The new wave of movies about kids-on-bikes. A return to one of Double Feature’s favorite genres, something about kids and a raft. A single inciting incident creates extremely divergent paths for the two protagonists. The one person in Super Dark Times who just doesn’t get their due credit. Continue reading

Hard Ticket to Hawaii + The Human Tornado

Hard Ticket to Hawaii + The Human Tornado

Exploitation films amidst a time of social justice. Falling in an out of love with exploitation. Chicago’s cult cinema scene in the early 2000s. Hard Ticket to Hawaii, sexploitation, and cringey stuff that’s still part of American football? The dirty feelings talking about the exploitation subgenre “blaxploitation” today. The Human Tornado is an underseen kunfu action comedy. Rap, hiphop, spoken word, jive talk, and whatever it is where you randomly break in rhyme during your action sequences. More than just Dolemite – the life and career of Rudy Ray Moore. When an artist has to die for people to learn about them. The influence of Rudy Ray Moore. Continue reading

Crawl + Train to Busan

Crawl + Train to Busan

Big disaster (bottle?) movies! Plus: a brand new, long-awaited feature for Double Feature members. Crawl gains good faith on the horror by cementing down the emotional character details. Video game level design. Florida as represented here and elsewhere in dark genre. Michael accidentally does a really terrible Sam Raimi impression without knowing it. Revisiting the work of Alexandre Aja. Train to Busan, the secret k-drama. Time to unveil the secondary theme: families torn apart but not by the monsters! Actually, it’s sort of…families put back together by monsters? The virtues of selfishness. A quick moment to consider if morality still exists. The world is cold and bleak. Continue reading

Hunger + If Beale Street Could Talk

Hunger + If Beale Street Could Talk

Fuck the law. The 2008 film Hunger, about the second hunger strike by Irish Republican Army member Bobby Sands. Fassbender, not eating, and abusing the audience. After checking his car for bonds, a cop no one wants to hang out with exits the frame so audiences can hang out with Michael Fassbender. Liam Cunningham as a man with a beard sitting at a table talking and talking and talking. How context sets up a long take.The Silent Bob trick. If Beal Street Could Talk it would tell you not to make cheap obnoxious jokes about it’s title. How the non-linear narrative makes the situation even more crushing. Here’s a bunch of really specific bad things, the good time was there but yada yada yada, and then here’s some more really awful things to dwell on. Continue reading

Spirited Away + Isle of Dogs

Spirited Away + Isle of Dogs

A brand new journey begins. This multi-part exploration of Studio Ghibli and stop motion sends Double Feature on an adventure to further understand animation. In the first part, Spirited Away takes a unique look at the coming of age genre by secretly using it as an indictment of soul-crushing capitalism. Then, Isle of Dogs makes a postcard case for Japan’s mostly broadly understood culture and directs it squarely at Americans. Also, the film is kind of gross, right? No one says “I love dogs.” Mainstream audiences respond, but does the film get away with it? Continue reading

Palm Springs + Color Out of Space

Palm Springs + Color Out of Space

Existential dread, modern living and cosmic horror! Palm Springs as more than meets the eye. Copying once is theft, copying many times is a sub-genre. Each step of escalation. Having the cake and then also eating the cake you have (because what we be the point of having a cake if you couldn’t eat it.) Color Out of Space brings on the cosmic horror – but what really is it? The fear of infinite space without the actual space. Actually let’s go back to that cake thing. Who is out there having a cake and not eating it? Isn’t that. waste of a cake? What a stupid phrase. Not in the show: a shaggy dog! Continue reading

First Cow + The Rider

First Cow + The Rider

Animals and poverty. First Cow and the struggle to start without capital. The Rider makes a case for unavoidable metaphor. When a cow is mysteriously the first, two double feature hosts with stumble through a longline exercise. Cookie meets the fugitive. There’s something suspect about this partnership. The best French fashions come into question as a pastry caper shines a new light on the bounds of human friendship. The Rider’s open embrace of southern American youth. Sympathetic masculinity, horse riding machismo, and the feeling when no GF. How modern day problems created added relevancy in a years-old film. Continue reading

Once Upon a Time in the West + Four Flies on Grey Velvet

Once Upon a Time in the West + Four Flies on Grey Velvet

Ennio Morricone through casual viewing. Italy gives exploitation a high-art spin. Totally unintentional: Dario Argento appears everywhere. How Once Upon a Time in the West creates tension differently than the well-cited Mexican stand-off. The Sergio Leone color coded hat system for differentiating protagonists and antagonists. Different films require different musical motifs! A unique byproduct of playing against type. Four Flies on Grey Velvet’s plot cheat allows audiences to live deliciously. To focus on the plot is to miss out on the piece. No colored hat system to be found. Continue reading

Jennifer’s Body + The Bling Ring

Jennifer’s Body + The Bling Ring

Movies that deserve a second look! The secrets overlooked with Jennifer’s Body and The Bling Ring. The creative triangle of Karyn Kusama, Diablo Cody and Megan Fox. What the original theatrical audience missed about Jennifer’s Body. The strongest voice in the room. The true story of The Bling Ring. A secret secret second theme. MySpace or whatever. The world in which this became a story. Who gets away with what. Hanging out in Paris Hilton’s house. While we’re at it, Paris Hilton was great in Repo the Genetic Opera. That’s just a fact. This isn’t an episode about Paris Hilton, though. It just takes place in her house. One of things – Emma Watson’s layered performance. Continue reading

Spider-Man Into the Spider-Verse + Bandersnatch

Spider-Man Into the Spider-Verse + Bandersnatch

New to the podcast? Start here! In a brand new run of the podcast: considering canon in the multi-verse! How Into the Spider-Verse breathes new life into Spider-Man. Various animation tricks that work in both substantive and stylistic ways. Bringing the team together! Netflix presents Black Mirror presents Bandersnatch: one new clever tick to fight piracy. How long is Bandersnatch? Do you play or watch Bandersnatch, and whichever it is, how much do you have to do before you’ve really experienced it? Self-destruction in the arts. Training an audience to desire chaos. Continue reading